Straightline Landscaping & Lawn Maintenance, Ltd.
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Care Tips

Helpful Information:

Sod - New sod should be watered daily. This will need to be more often during hot weather. Watering times may vary depending upon soil types, grades, temperatures, and water pressure. When watering sod, you will want the water to penetrate the sod and the top ½" to 1" of soil. The best way to determine this is to occasional pick up a corner of sod in the area being watered. If it is wet and moist, it is time to move the sprinkler. Time how long it takes for this to occur to help you gauge future watering times. This watering should be done for approx. 6 weeks. Within this period, occasionally try to lift a corner of sod, it should begin to root and pulling up becomes difficult.

Once your lawn has become established, we recommend watering for a longer period of time, however, watering less frequent (2 times a week). This is to encourage the grass roots to extend deep into the soil and provide for a healthier lawn.

Do not mow new sod for 2 weeks. After two weeks, make sure sod is rooting into soil by pulling on corner of sod. Set the mowing height on the highest setting. It is best to bag the clippings for the first month. If you do decide to mulch the grass clippings, remember not to cut off more than 15% of the grass blade at one time. If mulching lawn clippings, mowing may need to be done more frequently during periods of quick growth.

Seed - New seed should be watered daily. This should be done 2 or 3 times per day during warm weather. This will need to be more often during hot weather. We suggest watering seed for only 5 to 15 minutes each time however, watering times may vary depending upon soil types, grades, temperatures, and water pressure. When watering seed, you will want the water to penetrate the dirt and the top ¼"to ¾" of soil. We cannot stress enough that the seed bed should always remain moist and not be allowed to dry out. However, be careful not to over water seed, which can cause the seed to rot. This watering method should be done for approx. 6 weeks. As the grass fills in and becomes more established, you will want to begin to water for a longer period of time, but less frequently. Re-seeding may have to be done in select areas for the first (3) years to provide a thick lush lawn.

Once your lawn has become established, we recommend watering for a longer period of time, however, watering less frequent (2 times a week). This is to encourage the grass roots to extend deep into the soil. This will provide for a healthier lawn.

Do not mow new seed for approx. 4 weeks. Set the mowing height on the highest setting. It is best to bag the clippings for the first month. Make sure the soil is dry to prevent any tearing of new grass. If you do decide to mulch the grass clippings, remember not to cut off mower than 15% of the grass blade at one time. If mulching lawn clippings, mowing may need to be done more frequently during periods of quick growth.

Trees - We recommend that trees get watered (2) times per week. This will need to be done more often during hotter weather. When watering trees, it is best to put the hose at the base of the trunk and turn on the hose for a slight trickle. This should be done for approx. 20 - 30 minutes per tree. Once again, the best gauge for watering is to pull mulch/stone back slightly and see if root ball is wet and soft.

Bushes - We recommend that bushes and evergreens be watered (2) times per week. This will need to be done more often during hotter weather. When watering bushes and evergreens, it is best to put the hose at the base of the trunk and turn on the hose for a slight trickle. Make sure that the entire area below the branches has been watered. This should be done for approx. 10 - 15 minutes per shrub or evergreen. Once again, the best gauge for watering is to pull mulch/stone aside slightly and see if root ball is wet and soft. This should be for approx. 6 weeks, but they should be watched carefully for the first year.

Perennials - We recommend that flowering perennials and ornamental grass watered (2) times per week. This will need to be done more often during hotter weather. When watering flowering perennials and ornamental grasses, it is best to put the hose at the base of the plant and turn on the hose for a slight trickle. This should be done for approx. 5 - 10 minutes per plant. Once again, the best gauge for watering is to pull mulch/stone aside slightly and see if root ball is wet and soft. This should be for approx. 6 weeks, but they should be watched carefully for the first year.

Ground Cover - Ground covers can be watered with a sprinkler much the same way as grass. This should be done (2x) per week for approximately 10-15 minutes. This will need to be done more often during hotter weather.

Hardwood Mulch - This may need to be replaced every year or two with a fresh layer. However to keep the mulch from looking bleached or loosing its color during the season, you may cultivate the mulch occasionally by taking a small (3) prong garden rake and turning the mulch.

Fertilizer - We recommend that you choose a good quality slow release fertilizer program for your lawn. We recommend minimum of (4) applications per year, maximum of (5) applications per year. Do not fertilize new sod or seed until after the 2nd mowing. We do not recommend fertilizing trees or shrubs unless there are visible signs requiring fertilizer. If necessary, we recommend either a balanced granular fertilizer, or a deep root fertilization performed by your landscape professional.

Weeds - Whether you chose mulch or stone, you may get the occasional weed in your landscape bed. We recommend putting Preen down (2) times per year. This is a preventative herbicide that provides a protective barrier to prevent weed seeds from germinating and growing. Occasionally, you will get a weed growing, we suggest that during your weekly maintenance, you take a few minutes and check your landscape beds for weeds. You may either put out by hand or spray with a non-selective herbicide, such as Round-up (this can be found in any home and garden store). If you choose the herbicide, be careful because it will harm your shrubs and flowers if they are sprayed or any small particles drift.